Dr. Sidharth Ghosh

Pituitary adenomas

Pituitary adenomas are tumors that occur in the pituitary gland, and account for about 10% of intracranial neoplasms. They often remain undiagnosed, and small pituitary tumors are found in 6 to 22 percent of adults at autopsy.

 

The pituitary gland is considered the “master gland” of the body; it produces hormones that regulate the other glands. Some tumors secrete one or more of these hormones in excess. Such so-called secretory pituitary adenomas are usually found due to hormonal imbalances that affect bodily functions.

 

Syndromes of secreting pituitary adenomas:

Prolactinoma
Cushing’s disease
Acromegaly
Hyperthyroidism TSH & Thyroid
 

Treatment of a secretory pituitary adenoma is directed not only at controlling tumor growth, but also at eliminating hormone over-production. True prolactinomas may often be successfully treated with medicine alone. Other secreting tumors are treated with surgery, radiosurgery, standard radiation therapy alone, or some combination.

 

Case – 1 Microadenoma

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Coronal plane MRI showing microadenoma.
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Sagittal plane MRI showing microadenoma.
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Clinical photograph – before surgery.
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Clinical photograph – after 3 months of surgery.
 

Case -2 Macroadenoma

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Coronal plane MRI showing macroadenoma.
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Sagittal plane MRI showing microadenoma.
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Clinical photograph – before surgery.
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Clinical photograph – after 6 months of surgery.